What are two phrases that Romeo uses to describe Juliet?

What are two phrases that Romeo uses to describe Juliet?

Romeo initially describes Juliet as a source of light, like a star, against the darkness: “she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night.” As the play progresses, a cloak of interwoven light and dark images is cast around the pair.

What are some examples of dramatic irony in Romeo and Juliet?

Dramatic irony: the audience knows the real reason why Juliet is crying: Romeo has been banished. Romeo returns to Verona. He find Juliet drugged, in a death-like sleep. He assumes she is dead and kills himself.

What is Romeo saying in his soliloquy?

When you think of soliloquy in Romeo and Juliet, your mind might instantly go to that famous balcony scene. Romeo looks up a Juliet and says, “But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?” Even if you don’t like William Shakespeare, the line is so ingrained in literature that you probably know it.

What is the monologue in Romeo and Juliet?

JULIET: Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband? When I, thy three-hours wife, have mangled it? But wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin? That villain cousin would have killed my husband.

What is Capulets opinion of Romeo?

What was Lord Capulet’s opinion of Romeo? He thinks he is a good well behaved young man.

How are Romeo and Juliet’s deaths foreshadowed throughout the play?

Romeo says “Come, death, and welcome. Juliet wills it so.” Juliet has a vision of Romeo “As one dead in the bottom of a tomb” (3.5). This heavy foreshadowing of the lovers’ deaths emphasizes that they are trapped by their fates. It also has the effect of making Romeo and Juliet’s love seem more precious.

What is the purpose of Friar Laurence soliloquy?

The Friar’s soliloquy is about the healing power of plants and herbs. However, he also warns that some plants used to heal can also be poisonous. This, of course, foreshadows the tragic events to come by indicating what will happen later on in the play.